The Idea Behind Live Articles

The Idea & Benefits

Today, I had this idea: articles on my website which aren't complete yet. There are a few use cases for why I think that there is more to it than just publishing unfinished articles:

  • Consider I'm working on some project. A live article could document my progress in real-time. More importantly, it would motivate me to finish the project since I've already put myself out there with the article.
  • I'm reading a new book. I'm using a live article to publish my notes to my book notes section while I'm making progress with the book. This could

    • motivate the reader of this blog to pick up the same book and read at same time as I do to compare thoughts.
    • motivate myself to read faster since I don't want the reader to wait for months.

This idea is a good way to contribute to the Learn in Public philosophy of which I'm convinced.

But: Live articles should have a certain amount of content to begin with, otherwise the reader might end up in front of an incoherent draft.

Rules

  • Whenever I change a live article, I have to update the time stamp.
  • Never edit the older content of post

    • unless it provides a major improvement of structure and clarity.
    • except typos & grammar mistakes.
  • Once the article is finished, it looses its live article status.

Downsides

  1. The reader might get frustrated reading unfinished articles.
  2. I can't think of a solution where the reader can get notified once the article gets updated. RSS feeds usually only notify a user when there is a totally new blog post. I might have to think of some way so that the reader doesn't have to check back on their own.

But since I'm convinced that this new format would improve the environment I'm working and learning in, I'll give live articles a try.

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